Sunday, May 25, 2008

Time To Get Serious...

May 18 – May 24, 2008

I received news that my WarP 9 was shipped Monday and it arrived at school on Tuesdays – yeah Fed Ex. Even better, it went to the front office and it was delivered to my room. There it was, all wrapped up on its little pallet just waiting for me to open it up – and I did. My fake motor model was pale in comparison to the real thing – all red and clean, but less I digress. Being only Tuesday, I figured why take it home for my wife to trip over, so I elected to leave it at school to show my students and friends. For those of you who have never taught school, the last two weeks are crazy. Students finishing projects, tests to prepare and give and all of those grades – thank God they just use 5 letters (but I do know a few that would get a “Z” if it were possible). Friday came and with a three day weekend ahead, it was time to take the motor home (as opposed to a motorhome).

It’s Saturday morning and I am mentally preparing to get it installed. I was only dreaming when I thought I could do it in an hour, but in reality it took less than five. First things first – get the fake motor out. Poster board and wood are not that heavy, but when you add the adapter plate, clutch, flywheel and motor adapter and stick it in a small hole, even this can be a challenge. Remember, it was all on the cradle when I installed it last time. I tried using the engine hoist, but it only got in the way. So with brute strength and those few choice words (please back, don’t fail me now), I got it out and was ready to install the real thing. I took all of my parts off from the fake motor and got my tools ready. The WarP 9 received a brand new lift bolt and took flight via the engine hoist. First up was the motor adapter. It slid right on and I tightened the set screws. The first one went in with no problems, but number two split at the top. I couldn’t get it out either, so a trip to the hardware store was needed anyway to get some shorter bolts for the adapter plate and a screw extractor small enough for the set screw. Seven dollars later I was home and got that screw out. Next up was the adapter plate and it fit perfect. My Plexiglas template worked great and every hole lined up on the money. Next the flywheel – and this is where problem number two arose. The spacing (and spacing is probably as critical as alignment) was off – by .157 inches. On my motor model I did not know exactly how deep the drive end pilot ring was so I guess and was off by .157 inches. The motor adapter was too long so another trip was in order – to my classroom so I could shorten it on the lathe. As you might have guessed, these two trips cost me an hour, but it was a beautiful day! So after taking it all apart, and reassembling it, I added the clutch and it was ready to go. Now I recruited my son and wife to finish the installation. I really did not want to take the trunk off so we opted for plan “B”, the squeeze play. One of us pushed while the other lowered it to clear the trunk lip. Once in the whole it was a matter of getting things to align. I knew this was critical because of my efforts to get it to work in the classroom with the fake motor. The clutch and transmission shaft and that darn spline all have to be right there in order for it to fit together. We tried several attempts and different positions before it slid in - and what a joyous moment it was!!! I was able to pull it together with just my hands afterwards and started to install the bolts. One after another they all fit and it was installed. The adapter on the other end aligned perfectly also, so it was four bolts and everything was secure. Weeks of planning with my fake motor paid big dividends in the end. Having to wait for the motor was a blessing in disguise. I can’t imagine trying to do all of this with the added weight of the real motor, either at school or home.

What’s next – battery racks… so until next week…

7 comments:

Brian said...

Bob,
Thank you very much for documenting your work on the web! Also, thanks for showing how you made your adapter plate. I have a 4 speed 85 Fiero I too am converting to electric. I share your feelings about the adapter plate costing $700~$800 being a little high. Did you make the motor/shaft adapter too? Would you be willing to share your CAD files?

I plan on using the same WarP 9 motor and currently, as of February have a Zilla 1k LV on order.

Good luck on your conversion and thank you once again for the web documentation!

Brian

EL (Electric) Fiero said...

I did make my motor adapter also. And yes I would share my Cad file. Drop me a line, off-line.

Bob

Shawn said...

Bob,
Great Blog! I am currently converting an 86 GT. I have just pulled the engine out so I have a ways to go. I am checking your site regulary. I do have a question about your recent air shock instalation. I am not sure how to get in contact with you. My e-mail address should be availible in follow-up.
Thanks,
Shawn

EL (Electric) Fiero said...

Shawn... I would be glad to answer any questions about the shocks.

Bob

Shawn said...

Bob,
I noticed that they airshock MA803 has a min/max length of 10.500/16.125. A typical stock shock shown for the Fiero has a min/max of 8.750"/12.375". Would the min length of 10.500" cause the shock to bottom out under suspension compression? It seams like it would be 1.25" too long.

Thanks for posting your experience on the web. The photographs and the written experience are an important part of the research material for my Fiero EV project.

Shawn

EL (Electric) Fiero said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
EL (Electric) Fiero said...

Brian...

You can email me directly by going to my EV Album link at the top of my blog. It's kind of the long way around, but it will get you to me with the comments.

Bob